The Original Promotion Mega Thread


#21

+1 - Also I’ll say that $60 one time fee doesn’t work for everyone, but it does for me because it takes me like 5 fucking years for every full length album I release… so…

if I was one of you glorious bastards that could pump out EPs and full lengths left and right, I could see how it would work out good. Or for that matter, want singles on Spotify… I haven’t really hopped on the “singles outside of soundcloud” phase yet in my music vision.


#22

Yeah, that’s the one part that sucks. CD Baby is technically better in that way


#23

When I was shocked by the one time fee price above in this thread, I was totally thinking of the single artist distrokid subscription.

But yea, now that you mention it, a $20 a month subscription probably wouldn’t do me any good. I realistically make about an EPs worth of finished songs a year haha. I kinda envy all the people that only care about writing music, I split my time 50/50 between honing my DJ skills and making tracks.

I think the route I’ll take in the future is to just make singles, get them mastered so I can mix them with commercial tracks. Put out mixes w/ my own tracks and send people to BC.


#24

I dont use it i just upload my herp derp experiments online and leAve it there as an archive mostly on yt and bc and sc, but then again i’m too lazy to market it nor do I expect anyone to listen to some of my other experiments out of all them maybe 10-25% percent would actually be listenable but even some of those I’m like I’ve exhausted this creatively so I just move on to the next track, and some of the stuff I made is honestly like the electronic version of a creed limp biz kit mashup, I’ve probably only made one ep that is actually listenable, all my other stuff is really just jam sessions, and me practicing sound design and other tricks on how to reproduce a certain sound…


#25

Yea it really depends on what your goal is. The internet is amazing for storage and access. For people doing electronic but not dance or pop stuff there aren’t many live venues outside of city centers so I dont even know how yall get heard off the internet.


#26

Once Spotify for artist is out of beta, uploading your music directly into Spotify will be a seamless as uploading music on to Soundcloud. This is will cause a lot of BC and SC artist to come over to Spotify more willingly, in the near future.

As regards to Instagram, it’s really gimmick for electronic music producers, people are literally getting followers for just remaking Pokemon songs and playing 4 chord progressions on modular synths, people prefer the appearance of looking like an amazing musician, rather than actually being critical of the music they listen to.

Honestly I want to put my music out on these platforms, however I want to first reach a certain quality threshold in terms of my music, before I start investing in my artistic career. I’m like 21 right now, and most of these famous producers are old as fuck, so I’m in no rush.


#27

Its weird, change. Us old men don’t like it but its going that way anyway so best not complain about it too much. Simmer down gramps


#28

I still make CDRs to play in my car. Lol.


#29

An artistic career shouldn’t be your only career…so yea…invest your time in having something stable that’ll keep you afloat…


#30

There are 3 most popular markets that gives back revenue the most (compared to other) - Spotify, iTunes, and Google Music (Google Play), but Spotify seems to be where you get the most traffic and it actually makes sense because how well implemented it feels. It’s really great for discovering new music. Bandcamp is also good but there you need to deal with tags as the main search function and plenty of stuff gets mis-tagged compared to what the actual content is. It’s also so bloated with half-assed efforts because everyone is a producer these days and in BC it’s free-to-upload just anything.

Now with Spotify, once you get on their database successfully it starts generating stuff around your artist profile and the most important thing is an appearance of “similar artists” tab. I don’t know how they define similar music to yours, but It Just Works™. So once you’re there you basically become connected and people can find your music while just casually listening their Spotify auto-generated music playlists that include there similar artists they dig which appear in that tab. And these playlists are crazy good and even being generated by genre. You just keep going, keep listening non-stop, it’s just wonderful to hear new stuff just like that rather than clicking bunch of links on BC and hoping it’s something good but it’s actually Kid Rock’s Christmas album in reverse.

Now entire revenue thing is pretty small but it’s better than nothing. For me, Bandcamp pretty much pays for DK services so my advice is to treat BC as an official artist page/the main hub. Spotify & the rest of gang should be the final step of final-final product you’re proud of. No random “ideas” and unfinished i’m-too-lazy efforts, that’s what Soundcloud is for (I would consider it the lowest-tier) so at least leave a good first impression. Finally, it’s all about accessibility and that’s the reason why streaming services are so successful. It feels more quality-controlled too because you have to pay to get your stuff there. Times have changed so adapt and don’t be like Tool guys who don’t have their albums out there because they’re so old-school-cool. A good thing that they’ve been famous before that so there’s still plenty of dad-rockers still buying their CDs. It’s all about getting your stuff out more in public rather than cashing in. I would say it’s a decent investment that just takes off really slowly.


#31

Of course, however I’m at a point where I feel like my college degree is simply a means to an end when it comes to me producing. There’s nothing else I rather be doing than make music :slight_smile:

but I don’t wanna be broke haha


#32

I see you found my secret alias


#33

It’s weird because the old way of trying to be part of the music business (play shows, get signed with hip new labels, tour with big bands and physical record sales) has changed into DIY internet and I am yelling at clouds. It can be a good thing but you have to find a niche that suits you, and maybe if you want, it fulfills your dream of playing that club gig and shit clicks and it goes well and people start talking about you just from that.

I typed that high as fuck and now looking back…still high as fuck…it doesn’t make any sense, fellas. Just eh.


#34

I dunno, that seems pretty spot on to me. As I have repeated on the forum many times, be involved IRL is how the only way I’ve ever got a gig. Listens and likes are just a cheap hit of dopamine, for me anyway.


#35

IRL is the most effective means for exposure over anything, agreed.

There’s tons of artists that rarely use any promotional tools online, but have like 6000+ followers on soundcloud, and that’s purely because they play live. If you can play live, you’ll gain a following tenfold that of being an online link pusher


#36

That’s what i was trying to get at…I mean, I’ve seen plenty of those “How can I promote myself” posts on here over the years and usually those people are talking about like counts and meaningless shit like that. Ideally, we should be out there playing gigs if we want exposure…THAT IS exposure, really. It’s starts in your city.

This story is from back in the myspace days but when i was last playing live with a full band, we had a few demo tracks posted up there and got relatively low listen counts numbering in the low teens for a couple of years as we rehearsed the material. Then we played one show with some bigger regional acts on a weekend and that listen count spiked the next day to well over 150. Now i’m not a DJ or in the EDM/IDM scene and don’t orbit that planet even but I’m sure it works the same way there.


#37

kind of unrelated but I’ve considered just printing out like, a thousand stickers of my project logo with a bandcamp link on it, and throwing it everywhere in my city. Just as an experiment, to see if it’d actually do anything.

Or leave stacks of stickers places. People eat that shit up.

myself included


#38

That’s a great idea, actually. Stickers are cheap now. If you have a college near-by concentrate there.

@Numerical Yea, besides the few listens I’ve gotten from IDMf, everything I’ve earned online has come from offline. Likewise offline came from offline.


#39

Might have to give it a whirl :slight_smile: Here in utah we have university of utah, utah valley university, BYU, AND salt lake community college all within a 30 mile radius. haha. This city is super college heavy.


#40

Dude, I live within an hour of at least 10 colleges, that’s a great idea. Except parking is expensive as hell, which means you need an accomplice to keep the car running… I mean, I got a brother for that. But he is a business major and not a believer in my ART, so I’d probably have to like, pay him.