Idmf space program


#1

share/talk about all things related to space and the visible wonders of the universe


#2

Those are awesome photos! I’ve always loved space, astronomy, Being a Trekie, member of the Planetary Society, Sci-fi buff.

I’m tempted to make a shameless plug for my recent Soundscape “Space Audacity.” Especially since it was instigated by competition on the old forum.


#3

I’m keeping an eye on New Horizon’s flyby of the most distant object ever visited by a man-made probe. Very interested to see what comes out of it as the flyby of pluto was a revelation.

I think we also had Voyager II get into interstellar space this year, so that’s some other distant news.


#4

The Parker Space probe is pretty awesome.

I have also been following the Insight probe on Mars to the point of obsession.


#5

Wow! This thread is as interesting as an issue of Planetary Report… and far more entertaining.

Thank you all


#6

im still holding my breath for warp drive travel to be available to the public.


#7

ouch. I think we really need antigravity for that to happen, and for antigravity to happen, we need to be able to reliably detect the gravity from people, planes, and boats inside the gravity well of earth for purposes of warfare. Since everyone loves stealth so much and being able to sense the gravity distortions caused by the mass of anything designed for stealth today would immediately invalidate every stealth option every nation has, that’s what’s going to start the big investment in researching anti-gravity. We’re starting to get there, reliably detecting very large gravity events from great distances, and I believe britain has a prototype they want to use to detect the gravity distortions from nearby planes. As that stuff ramps up, we get the investment into DARPA and the like to find some sort of gravity cloak, which I believe is going to take anti-gravity to make work in some fashion. From there, you can start to apply it to other things, like aerospace.


#8

Well… at least the path to success is clear. It appears I was worried for nothing


#9

" Comet 46P/Wirtanen made its closest approach to Earth on Dec. 16, when it passed just over 7 million miles (11 million kilometers) from our planet, about 30 times farther away than the Moon. Although its close approach is valuable for making science observations from Earth, and it is the brightest comet of 2018, 46P/Wirtanen is only barely visible to the unaided eye even where the sky is very dark. It is best viewed through binoculars or a telescope.

Backyard observers can currently find the comet near the constellation Taurus though with the challenge of added light from the Moon, but it will continue to be viewable in the weeks to come. Finder charts and other information are available at the Comet Wirtanen Observing Campaign website.

Comet 46P/Wirtanen orbits the Sun once every 5.4 years, much quicker than the 75-year orbit of the more famous comet Halley. Most of its passes through the inner solar system are much farther from Earth, making this year’s display particularly notable."


#10

Here is little project funded by a private space advocacy group… the Planetar Society. I’ve been a member since it was started in 1983.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!:boom::confetti_ball::clinking_glasses::loud_sound::musical_score::clap:


#11

I had no idea China was doing this, it’s kind of nuts (in a good way).