What do you do with your project files if you have like 100-200

What would you do ? I just have a lot of project files accumulated. And I’m thinking of deleting half or doing something. I will just reinstall Windows and the files will be lost. Or save the projects you want separately to your hard drive.

Delete them iff the last modified date is over a year old. Maybe bounce some things to audio for sample fodder.

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what i do you ask? i back them up on separate harddrives then forget what i was doing and then try to organize them and get less than halfway each time and its always a big frustrating mess.

but honestly they don’t take up all that much space and it can be delightful to revisit old projects, i say save them. only make sure you collect all the samples used and maybe even bounce all VST’s used so that you don’t have missing shit when you open them later.

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I archive everything. Drive space is cheap.

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i go through every 6 months and listen to sessions to see if they’re something i think i’d ever return to and start shucking shit in the bin.

i did this recently and as a result im updating and mixing down some tracks for a techno EP.

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For me it all becomes a huge mess very quick, especially when you use bullshit project names that don’t really tell much what was it all about. But project folders usually aren’t that huge in size, unless there’s lots of resampled audio so deleting them can be avoided. You never know, maybe one day you will want to check some out, do some files archeology.

When there’s too many sketch/crap projects I just move them into a single folder and add a date when I compiled it all. Then I move it to some external disc and create a new “Projects” folder. Repeat the process annually. Also, before doing that I try to collect all audio bounces from these unfinished projects and make a special sample pack, sometimes it comes pretty useful for new ideas. Sometimes.

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That’s a great point. You get a lot more mileage from archiving and revisiting if things are well organized. I hate digging through piles of shit to find gems, but if I have an idea of what I’m looking at, it’s a lot more palatable.

When i find a batch of “keepers” they get put into folders based on the time frame and then loose genre. Also, if i get something thats a little further along, i tend to render an MP3 of the work in progress to keep in the project folder so I dont need to launch the session to know what it is.

So i’ll have a Dir on my HD that is named

Spring Summer 2019

with subfolders

Industrial Stuff
Techno/House
Client work
Ambient/Shoegaze
Synthwave/Soundtrack

Naming then my “era” helps with cohesiveness when i am going back to finish stuff up as i tend to write in “chunks” and my outputs is all over the place stylistically.

Once a track from any of these archives gets finished and gets a “real” title I go in and change the project folder to that name and typically move it to a dir that contains the other songs for said release/project/whatever

:edit: i also use the mac tagging/color scheme to keep things organized by how far along the song is, so Green is finished, Red might need mixing, Purple arrangement, etc.

I press Delete but some files needed to be backuped :smiley:
THX FOR REPLIES
with audio.

Output the best sections as loops and build a library of your own self samples for chopping up into new tracks.

Do something. Backup.

Or, if you have more patience and time:
Open a file, listen to it, then each track seperatly. Keep just the best tracks.( Or samples/loops/track renders/efx chains/bar renders/etc…) Or render the song down if it is finished…
Export the stuff to a new folder.
. And when you finish this process just make some music from stuff in that folder. Maybe aim to preserve what worked really well.

If you end up each time with 20 percent of the original song, you can make 40 tracks out of 200 ideas if you combine them. (Samplewise, not lenghtwise)
If you want to have five times more samples in them, you get out 8 songs.
Like pressing a lifetime into a year / deleting half of them.

I think you can do around 10 tracks per hour.

That is what i would do and i did it few times.
Another thing is that i suspect your 200 projects can have only around 3-4gb. That goes on an usb. Deleting those files just for a new windows is not worth it.

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size of folder is 20Gb tho i deleted some.

Damn that is a lot. Do you have unused samples in projects or why is it that large?

I was wondering that too. The only things I can think of are if if you save a copy of all your samples in the project folder or have a bunch of rendered WIP files in WAV or whatever. Or if you just have a metric fuckton of projects. Either way, it seems like more of a workflow issue.

Even then, 20GB isn’t much of anything. You can’t hardly buy a laptop with less than 256GB nowadays, and 4TB hard drives are common and fairly cheap. I can’t imagine being fussed over 20GB if you decided it’s stuff that’s worth keeping.

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I told you that i need to clean up. Maybe it’s because i used to many sample packs in my production, too many loops you know i downloaded around 150 Gb of Sample Packs

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I always “collect & save” the samples in my projects (in Live) to make sure that the audio pool of a project is never missing a file.
Then i can go from a project to an other, swap samples.
I also often save Track Groups as .alc file in my user library & then easily recall these as “presets” for a new song start.
I know my Live Project folder is way too heavy, but i like to keep ideas as presets …

image

My sessions get large as well due to the fact that I’m recording and printing a lot of audio, especially after the mix is finished and i get into archive mode. Print all stems w fx, the master bus w fx, aux returns etc.

Drives are cheap, losing important shit sucks.

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I render audio clip of everything that I am working on and keep it on my desktop. If I get sick of the clip I delete it and stop working on the project. If my desktop gets full it is time to ditch a hand full or two projects.

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Yeah, a bunch of files of which I don’t remember or also making a track and all of the sudden something in my brains clicks to a sound in one of those files and I need that sound and pattern I made to make the track 110 percent complete. Then I found myself spending a half hour going through files trying to find it.

I have learned to create a save system. When saving files, it might help to use letters or numbers for the stage of the song to appear either before or after the song name you save it as. You can put letters before and numbers behind the name of the save file. The numbers can be on a scale of one to ten how good or urgent it is, or you can assign numbers for stages etc.

The more organized you are, the easier it is to find what you need and maximize what you have. Here is some File abbreviations for example. You can fill a flash card with abbreviation meanings.

RD-playingaroundwithmidi-A4.file

RD - Rough Draft
SA - Song Aranging
ST - Stems
Mi - Mixed
MA - Master

A - Attention level (Number is how good It is on a scale of 1-5)
When I pick a new file, start with 5/5 then 4/5, etc. From best to least, etc.

Even if you don’t like my system, I recommend doing something that works for you! :slight_smile:

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I just purge as well some of them are half songs or one shot sound designs that I never go back to cause the idea was just practicing or a failed idea.