Music theory, idm and DJing; A must?! - Page 2
You are Unregistered, please register to gain Full access.    
Advertisements


Music Theory & Composition Questions & comments about composition, arrangement, and music theory. Music rules and how to follow or break them.

Reply
Thread Tools
Old 09-01-2015, 07:39 PM   #21
Kemono
Granular Poster
Kemono has much to be proud ofKemono has much to be proud ofKemono has much to be proud ofKemono has much to be proud ofKemono has much to be proud ofKemono has much to be proud ofKemono has much to be proud ofKemono has much to be proud ofKemono has much to be proud ofKemono has much to be proud of
Kemono's Avatar
Age: 36
Posts: 68
MC Status: 1310
Thanks: 5
Thanked 26 Times in 17 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and djing; A must?!

I'm not sure why we are discussing this anymore,
we all seem to share the same opinion anyhow.

Theory is not vital, but makes the job a whole lot easier somehow.

Advertisements

Kemono is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 09:06 PM   #22
radiobeatsonlin
Learning The Ropes
radiobeatsonlin is currently spamming hard
radiobeatsonlin's Avatar
NYC
Posts: 8
MC Status: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and djing; A must?!

I was a DJ for a long time prior to starting production. I had the attitude that I didn't need theory for my first few years producing. I made some stuff just out of pure dedication and passion but after I learned theory my skill level went dramatically up! My advice is to learn some basic theory then go apply. Learn more then apply. You don't have to sit down for 2 months str8 and study, just a few minutes per day and before you know it you'll have some music theory knowledge. I also would recommend starting with rhythm. This was a big one for me cause as a DJ i felt like my rhythm was super tight. After I caved in and put the work in to learn what a 1/8th note was, or a dotted note was it made my productions both instruments and drums way better. LEARN IT!!!!
radiobeatsonlin is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Currently Listening To: New J.Cole, New Fab, Anything Dope!
Old 12-01-2015, 07:24 PM   #23
Crude_beats
Banned
Crude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MC
Rocking my boat across the seven seas
Posts: 2,634
MC Status: 115728
Thanks: 1,268
Thanked 461 Times in 353 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and djing; A must?!

Quote:
This sounds like 'Hard work isn't for everyone'. Which is something that is starting to become somewhat common with electronic musicians, with how easy it is to get your hands on music production gear/software. Some people aren't willing to put in hard work or to practice/study. Getting better at something ins't always fun and exciting. Studying and practice are by their nature fairly boring activities.
I think there is a difference between hard work and working a lot. Practice is good but there are many ways of practicing. The brain learns always you don't need to play scales to learn stuff for example.


Quote:
Maybe YOU can know what those sound like, but how do you describe them to someone else? All of those things can be described with theory. Blues music for instance, uses a particular scale, and generally follows a particular harmonic progression. Reggae has a very distinct accent pattern. Western music IS theory (unless you;re talking about country-western), and Arabic is just another type of music theory that has developed in that particular region of the world, apart from the western classical tradition.
I produce. People tell me what they want and I can make it. No need for me to telling people what I want. I'm saying I can make Blues or Arabic without having read any theory about it as its simply about finding notes that sound Arabic in the context, sure you can read this or you can just try the 12 notes you have to choose from, its not that many. Since I can't even read note sheets its a big hassle to make out anything related to theory so I just play a long to melodies I remember as being arabic to make it so.

Quote:
You're confusing theory with the ideas of timbre and instrumentation. Theory doesn't care what instruments are playing the music, or what they sound like. Theory describes the relationship between pitches with relation to each other over time. It cares not what your reggae guitar sounds like.
No I'm just saying for me the timbre, sound and idea of a particular element in a song is more important then to know how it fits with theory. Cause I can hear in my mind what I want, knowing what it is called is irrelevant for me. That is all theory really is putting a name to something. Your experience for determining what notes fit together and which doesn't is easily as valuable as theory. If someone tells me this is a jazz chord or this is a blues progression maybe its not even the progression I had in mind cause I like that kind of blues or this kind of jazz where they use something different.

Quote:
Theory is telling you WHY it works and WHY it sounds good. Understanding music at a fundamental level can always be seen as advantageous.
I can sum that up in one or two sentences. Two or more frequencies played at same time harmonize with each other in different ways, the emotion and perception of this harmony is deeply rooted in music culture. Finding relations and progressions that you think sound good (or how you want them to sound) is what is important. You can do this just by auditioning the 12 notes you have at your disposal its not that much to choose from really.

And I'm not against learning some basic music theory. I said its probably advantageous to most people. Its just that you gotta choose what to spend time with. If you know the very basics what is more important to you? Reading more or just making stuff? I can't read more theory and I can't practice scales singing etc cause I think its boring. I can't approach music unless I find it very enjoyable. I had a rut some years ago where I over thinked my music, when every song was a struggle from start to finish more or less. These days I just go by feeling all the time and play and improvise over and over to make my songs cause that is what is fun to me. I need to have fun or I cannot motivate myself to anything. A lot of people have the view that you need to do boring stuff to learn something but you can often just make a different kind of exercise and it gets way more fun. Maybe its not as efficient but in the long run what will make you stick with something? If its fun or if it wears you down and drains your energy?

Physical exercise is a good example. Its so deeply rooted that you need to go to a gym, stand in a group with bunch of other people and move around to some instruction from some PT guy/girl. Just put good music on and jump around at home, its cheaper, you save time, you can have your own music, and it can be more fun if its your thing. Put up a mirror and practice some fancy moves. some people like the whole gym concept thats fine but I know many who struggle to get their ass there. If it wears them you down like so, why are they doing it? Cause we have a very weird perception of what progress through hard work mean. Work doesn't need to be "hard" even if you do it a lot. Also think about that its easier to do something a lot if you enjoy it and its easier to maintain your energy over the day for other projects if everything feels fun.

Everything I do with music these days gives me energy, boosts my day and makes me happy. I'd never go back to make something that is a struggle (like complextro kind of stuff for me). I'd never write on my novels if its a tough thing to do. I do not mix unless I feel like it. I do not force myself to write vocals. Everything has its time I just do what I feel like in the now and that is enough to finish songs so its all good.

Last edited by Crude_beats; 12-01-2015 at 07:47 PM..
Crude_beats is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2015, 07:42 PM   #24
Lepstok
Knob Twiddler
Lepstok has a reputation beyond reputeLepstok has a reputation beyond reputeLepstok has a reputation beyond reputeLepstok has a reputation beyond reputeLepstok has a reputation beyond reputeLepstok has a reputation beyond reputeLepstok has a reputation beyond reputeLepstok has a reputation beyond reputeLepstok has a reputation beyond reputeLepstok has a reputation beyond reputeLepstok has a reputation beyond repute
Lepstok's Avatar
Posts: 219
MC Status: 2410
Thanks: 4
Thanked 48 Times in 35 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and djing; A must?!

Well in my opinion it is kinda like being illiterate. You don't need to be literate in order to talk and communicate but it sure makes it a whole lot easier.
To me music theory is one of the most interesting aspects of music. I don't understand the people who say it ruined the way they looked at music or it limited their ability to create. It should be an almost endless source of inspiration. You are not obliged to apply the theory once you understand it. I have tracks where I approach the chord progressions in a really strict classical theory way (no parallel octaves or fifths, classic cadences) and I have tracks where I wrote without any music theory in mind, just wrote in the notes that sounded nice.

Music is a form of communication and communication rests on coherency. You don't need to know syntax to communicate but knowing it can make communication a whole lot more coherent.
Knowing whether a chord is a G# or an Ab might not make a whole lot difference in terms of sound but it will in terms of overall coherency.
Lepstok is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 13-01-2015, 12:11 PM   #25
Crude_beats
Banned
Crude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MC
Rocking my boat across the seven seas
Posts: 2,634
MC Status: 115728
Thanks: 1,268
Thanked 461 Times in 353 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and djing; A must?!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lepstok View Post
Well in my opinion it is kinda like being illiterate. You don't need to be literate in order to talk and communicate but it sure makes it a whole lot easier.
To me music theory is one of the most interesting aspects of music. I don't understand the people who say it ruined the way they looked at music or it limited their ability to create. It should be an almost endless source of inspiration. You are not obliged to apply the theory once you understand it. I have tracks where I approach the chord progressions in a really strict classical theory way (no parallel octaves or fifths, classic cadences) and I have tracks where I wrote without any music theory in mind, just wrote in the notes that sounded nice.

Music is a form of communication and communication rests on coherency. You don't need to know syntax to communicate but knowing it can make communication a whole lot more coherent.
Knowing whether a chord is a G# or an Ab might not make a whole lot difference in terms of sound but it will in terms of overall coherency.
I do not disagree with this at all. Of course it helps. If people feel it limits them I think they are just not experienced enough with writing songs and applying theory yet. I just don't find theory that interesting myself and prioritize other things when spending my time on music related stuff.
Crude_beats is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 13-01-2015, 05:06 PM   #26
Schnork
IDMf Artist
Schnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MC
Schnork's Avatar
Age: 32
Posts: 961
MC Status: 19910
Thanks: 122
Thanked 398 Times in 291 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and djing; A must?!

I just stumbled across these thwo books regarding this matter.


Music Theory for Computer Musicians by Michael Hewitt

Quote:
Many DJs, gigging musicians, and electronic music producers understand how to play their instruments or make music on the computer, but they lack the basic knowledge of music theory needed to take their music-making to the next level and compose truly professional tracks. Beneath all the enormously different styles of modern electronic music lie certain fundamentals of the musical language that are exactly the same no matter what kind of music you write. It is very important to acquire an understanding of these fundamentals if you are to develop as a musician and music producer. Put simply, you need to know what you are doing with regard to the music that you are writing. "Music Theory for Computer Musicians" explains these music theory fundamentals in the most simple and accessible way possible. Concepts are taught using the MIDI keyboard environment and today's computer composing and recording software. By reading this book and following the exercises contained within it, you, the aspiring music producer/computer musician, will find yourself making great progress toward understanding and using these fundamentals of the music language. The result will be a great improvement in your ability to write and produce your own original music.

Harmony for Computer Musicians by Michael Hewitt


Quote:
Home music producers now have access to a wide variety of software synthesizers, samplers, and FX devices on their computers - devices that had previously been available only in expensive hardware forms. Although computer musicians often show a high degree of skill and expertise with the technology they use to produce their music, many mistakenly assume that this is all they need to produce quality tracks. Yet there is often a vital ingredient missing: a useful knowledge of the way the language of music actually works - an understanding of the ingredients of music and how they are put together; what scales, chords, modes, and keys are; and the principles of arrangement, melody, and harmony. In other words, computer musicians may have learned how to use their instruments, but this does not necessarily mean that they know how to create professional-sounding music using those instruments. This book was written to help computer musicians grow in their knowledge of musical harmony, knowledge that is essential for the skilled creation of complex musical works. Topics include intervals, tonality and the key system, part writing, triads, tonic and dominant harmony, modulation, and modal interchange and harmony. Techniques are taught using the tools computer musicians are most familiar with. Rather than using a conventional score format, most of the materials are presented in the familiar piano roll format of computer music sequencing programs. For practice, the companion CD contains numerous short exercises that will considerably improve the musician's skill in the art of musical harmony.

Are any of you familiar with these books?
Schnork is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Thanks to Schnork
Jaded (27-01-2015)
Old 13-01-2015, 09:37 PM   #27
Bipolar Joe
Master of the LFO
Bipolar Joe has a reputation beyond reputeBipolar Joe has a reputation beyond reputeBipolar Joe has a reputation beyond reputeBipolar Joe has a reputation beyond reputeBipolar Joe has a reputation beyond reputeBipolar Joe has a reputation beyond reputeBipolar Joe has a reputation beyond reputeBipolar Joe has a reputation beyond reputeBipolar Joe has a reputation beyond reputeBipolar Joe has a reputation beyond reputeBipolar Joe has a reputation beyond repute
Bipolar Joe's Avatar
Posts: 458
MC Status: 9010
Thanks: 28
Thanked 180 Times in 137 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and djing; A must?!

I have the Music Theory book, it's a very good starter, but it's not gonna teach you anything you can't learn by yourself watching free YouTube videos (Like Lypur's piano and theory lessons). If you prefer to read over watching videos, it's a good book to get. Really, it's just an average theory book with the word DAW thrown in.

------------------
Try a lowpassed square wave, moron.

Also, buy my God damn music, please.
Bipolar Joe is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 26-01-2015, 04:57 PM   #28
Schnork
IDMf Artist
Schnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MC
Schnork's Avatar
Age: 32
Posts: 961
MC Status: 19910
Thanks: 122
Thanked 398 Times in 291 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and djing; A must?!

Could you recommend a similar book that is not as expensive?
Schnork is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 27-01-2015, 03:57 PM   #29
Jaded
Total mad cunt
Jaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MC
Jaded's Avatar
Posts: 4,290
MC Status: 6906609
Thanks: 4,784
Thanked 3,548 Times in 2,148 Posts
I love people who say that they love playing music (as in melodies, harmonies and chords) but they find theory boring. If you're a practising musician theory is really very simple and also a lot of fun to learn. Anyone who claims to be a musician that says theory limits you, is not a musician.

And just because there are books on theory that give chords a certain name or whatever, it doesn't mean you have to remember them. And if you're reading a classical theory book, there's a jazz book you could pick up that would describe the exact same notes using a completely different language.

And fuck, these days, you don't even need a book. There are so many sites and apps full of information. If you press a particular combination of keys, it's very easy to identify the scale, interval or chord, and thus note your progression and determine which harmonic elements you could explore which might complement these.

Even then, you could never even pick up a book in your whole life. You are still studying theory. And unless you've grown up in a vacuum, or a remote village absent of western music, your theory will conform to the rules of western music. Theory isn't something written down in a book. Theory is something you form in your mind. When you figure out that C-E-G sounds good, that's a theory. There's no way of proving that these sound good, but you hypothesise that they will and, upon striking them you determine this to be true. Test another hypothesis, make a determination. Prove or disprove your theory.

Like I said, if you think theory is boring, you don't enjoy music. Just because you do everything by ear, and choose not to attempt to articulate what you are doing, it doesn't mean your not studying theory. And the biggest irony is that if you have experience and practise in your instrument then there's no reason not to study theory. It's incredibly easy to learn if you can already play an instrument. And what you'll find is that all of a sudden, things that you've always struggled with will be trivial.

The next time someone tells you that theory is limiting, tell them that they should never pick up an instrument again if they think that, because it's impossible to play a single note without having a theory as to how that note should be played.

Theory doesn't limit you, it liberates you. If you have no theory, you're just some loser sitting at a keyboard making noise.

Quote:
Originally Posted by UCoB View Post
i feel like this is an urban legend and nobody actually says things like this. it's just doesn't make any sense to me.
The only people I've heard say this are people who haven't learned any theory. I actually had a guy at a party one night chewing my ear off about this and saying how he doesn't need to know theory to be able to jam. So I cut the music and we gathered around the piano and I had him play for a few bars before joining in and playing an upper harmony. Then I played something melodic and waited for him to play some chords. He was very upset, I told him to go learn some theory.

Literally the only other time I heard this was when I was in eight grade and was falling behind at school and shot my mouth off to a mate and he schooled me in this way. He went on to be in a really successful band and is pretty much living the dream now as a household name... A constant reminder of the importance of theory.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dataf1ow View Post
It's also a must if you ever want to collaborate or communicate with trained musicians. It's much easier to describe musical ideas if everyone is speaking the same musical language (theory), not disparate lingos that may or may not have been developed in a bedroom studio while making beats.
Man, there is nothing worse than working with a "musician" who can't talk shop.

Me: "Nice bass line dude, but drop that second E down a measure"
Them: "Which one's the second E?"
Me: "I thought you said you could play bass guitar?"
Them: "Yeah I can" *starts playing some 'slap' bass*

I mean, it's not like I expect everyone should know everything and plenty know more than I do. But at least understand the composition your own compositions.

Last edited by Jaded; 27-01-2015 at 04:24 PM..
Jaded is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Thanks to Jaded
Son of Akira (28-02-2015)
Old 27-01-2015, 04:06 PM   #30
professurreal
IDMf Artist
professurreal is a savage MCprofessurreal is a savage MCprofessurreal is a savage MCprofessurreal is a savage MCprofessurreal is a savage MCprofessurreal is a savage MCprofessurreal is a savage MCprofessurreal is a savage MCprofessurreal is a savage MCprofessurreal is a savage MCprofessurreal is a savage MC
professurreal's Avatar
at the end of the tunnel
Age: 37
Posts: 2,366
MC Status: 59510
Thanks: 1,534
Thanked 1,190 Times in 791 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and djing; A must?!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crude_beats View Post
You can do this just by auditioning the 12 notes you have at your disposal its not that much to choose from really.
If you are speaking about single note melodies then you are right. When youre making chords out of 3 or 4 notes there are slightly more combinations... not even taking into consideration where you are playing the notes you choose for your chord...

------------------
professurreal is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 27-01-2015, 04:10 PM   #31
Jaded
Total mad cunt
Jaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MCJaded is a savage MC
Jaded's Avatar
Posts: 4,290
MC Status: 6906609
Thanks: 4,784
Thanked 3,548 Times in 2,148 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and djing; A must?!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Schnork View Post
I just stumbled across these thwo books regarding this matter.

Music Theory for Computer Musicians by Michael Hewitt


Harmony for Computer Musicians by Michael Hewitt


Are any of you familiar with these books?
These books are great. I've used these for teaching theory to computer musicians. My recommendation is the theory book first, then the harmony.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Schnork View Post
Could you recommend a similar book that is not as expensive?
No. You can buy it new for twenty bucks. That's how much books cost. And honestly, I haven't come close to finding another book that Hans Zimmer could use to learn theory. He speaks fluent piano roll, as he puts it.
Jaded is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 28-01-2015, 09:51 AM   #32
Schnork
IDMf Artist
Schnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MCSchnork is a savage MC
Schnork's Avatar
Age: 32
Posts: 961
MC Status: 19910
Thanks: 122
Thanked 398 Times in 291 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and DJing; A must?!

Thank you, IŽll get them! I need a theory refresh so bad
Schnork is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 28-01-2015, 08:55 PM   #33
Praqzis
Minor Glitch
Praqzis is a glorious beacon of lightPraqzis is a glorious beacon of lightPraqzis is a glorious beacon of lightPraqzis is a glorious beacon of lightPraqzis is a glorious beacon of light
Praqzis's Avatar
Seattle, WA
Posts: 48
MC Status: 460
Thanks: 5
Thanked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and DJing; A must?!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaded View Post
I love people who say that they love playing music (as in melodies, harmonies and chords) but they find theory boring. If you're a practising musician theory is really very simple and also a lot of fun to learn. Anyone who claims to be a musician that says theory limits you, is not a musician.

...

Theory doesn't limit you, it liberates you. If you have no theory, you're just some loser sitting at a keyboard making noise.
I agree with you in spirit. I'm a jazz piano player and have a lot of theory knowledge because of it (not a lot of more advanced/classic theory, but still quite a bit). What I find though is that I limit myself by thinking so much of the theory and "rules" that I don't play by ear enough. So a big focus of mine the last several years is learning to use my ear more and more.

There's been enough times lately that I hear something that sounds awesome and when I dive into it, it seems like it "shouldn't work." But it does.

But like I said, I agree with the intention I believe you are trying to express. Theory helps get me out of a lot of corners and opens up a whole new world of possibilities when you know about chord substitutions, different scales, etc. You can then make your progressions and melodies more than just the three chords + major/minor scale that you hear in so much music today.
Praqzis is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 13-02-2015, 02:57 PM   #34
dollymehta
Regular Freak
dollymehta has a spectacular aura aboutdollymehta has a spectacular aura about
Posts: 14
MC Status: 160
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and DJing; A must?!

Music theory is the study of how notes flow, work and mixing.
dollymehta is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Thanks to dollymehta
PROton42 (14-02-2015)
Old 13-02-2015, 03:18 PM   #35
Kvlt O)))
Is a retard
Kvlt O))) is a savage MCKvlt O))) is a savage MCKvlt O))) is a savage MCKvlt O))) is a savage MCKvlt O))) is a savage MCKvlt O))) is a savage MCKvlt O))) is a savage MCKvlt O))) is a savage MCKvlt O))) is a savage MCKvlt O))) is a savage MCKvlt O))) is a savage MC
Posts: 6,753
MC Status: 153560
Thanks: 3,344
Thanked 3,071 Times in 2,153 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and DJing; A must?!

Wishing you never learned theory is like wishing you never learned how to read. Whoever said either of those things is a proud moron.
Kvlt O))) is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 13-02-2015, 08:09 PM   #36
Dataf1ow
IDMf Artist
Dataf1ow is a savage MCDataf1ow is a savage MCDataf1ow is a savage MCDataf1ow is a savage MCDataf1ow is a savage MCDataf1ow is a savage MCDataf1ow is a savage MCDataf1ow is a savage MCDataf1ow is a savage MCDataf1ow is a savage MCDataf1ow is a savage MC
Dataf1ow's Avatar
Posts: 1,555
MC Status: 47764252
Thanks: 94
Thanked 242 Times in 157 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and DJing; A must?!

Quote:
Originally Posted by dollymehta View Post
Music theory is the study of how notes flow, work and mixing.
Kind of. But not really.

------------------
Dataf1ow is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Thanks to Dataf1ow
Muse-ic (16-02-2015)
Old 13-02-2015, 08:38 PM   #37
Smile_Price
Soundwave Mangler
Smile_Price is a splendid one to beholdSmile_Price is a splendid one to beholdSmile_Price is a splendid one to beholdSmile_Price is a splendid one to beholdSmile_Price is a splendid one to beholdSmile_Price is a splendid one to beholdSmile_Price is a splendid one to beholdSmile_Price is a splendid one to behold
Smile_Price's Avatar
Posts: 187
MC Status: 960
Thanks: 11
Thanked 19 Times in 18 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and DJing; A must?!

Just depends on whether or not you think your music sounds right/good. If not, then heck yeah, better read up. Honestly you can learn music theory in a few Wikipedia sessions if you understand the concepts, as a long-time musician should.

Last edited by Smile_Price; 16-02-2015 at 08:40 AM..

------------------
Smile_Price is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 14-02-2015, 12:34 AM   #38
PhantomSignal
Soundscaper
PhantomSignal has a reputation beyond reputePhantomSignal has a reputation beyond reputePhantomSignal has a reputation beyond reputePhantomSignal has a reputation beyond reputePhantomSignal has a reputation beyond reputePhantomSignal has a reputation beyond reputePhantomSignal has a reputation beyond reputePhantomSignal has a reputation beyond reputePhantomSignal has a reputation beyond reputePhantomSignal has a reputation beyond reputePhantomSignal has a reputation beyond repute
PhantomSignal's Avatar
Sonoma /San Francisco
Posts: 314
MC Status: 7460
Thanks: 57
Thanked 149 Times in 109 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and DJing; A must?!

Theory helps.

2 examples.

1) I did a live ableton versus ableton set with a mate and dude kept dropping things in on odd counts. Like, throwing in a loop at the on an odd measure number...like early or later than the natural start of a cadence. It was aggravating because the proverbial "1" kept moving around and it made everything disjointed. Seems simple but, knowing where that implied 1 is and just being able to count music mentally, huge. He also couldn't hear when something was really dissonant in the mix. I think this applies to DJing as well: It's really hard to find two tracks that blend together IN KEY with one another, or at least not offensively dissonant together. Nothing ruins a mix IMO more than dissonant blends (unless it's all dissonant) except save maybe just totally trainwrecking mixes


2) when producing, I can hear ideas in my head at this point and know what it looks like on a guitar or piano or how I would play it on a drum set. Having the theoretical ability to know the relationships of notes and chords mentally before even opening the DAW save a lot of time and makes those productions much more complete sounding than when i work in reverse: Turn on the DAW and see what comes out. My head is a way better scratch pad.
PhantomSignal is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 16-02-2015, 09:19 AM   #39
Muse-ic
Wanderer
Muse-ic is a savage MCMuse-ic is a savage MCMuse-ic is a savage MCMuse-ic is a savage MCMuse-ic is a savage MCMuse-ic is a savage MCMuse-ic is a savage MCMuse-ic is a savage MCMuse-ic is a savage MCMuse-ic is a savage MCMuse-ic is a savage MC
Muse-ic's Avatar
Posts: 5,703
MC Status: 6963183
Thanks: 6,185
Thanked 4,075 Times in 2,700 Posts
Re: Music theory, idm and DJing; A must?!

Quote:
Originally Posted by dollymehta View Post
Music theory is the study of how notes flow, work and mixing.
Nah. Music theory is actually pretty fucking exact. You are talking more about composition.
Muse-ic is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Thanks to Muse-ic
Kvlt O))) (16-02-2015)
Old 24-02-2015, 05:16 AM   #40
Bel Amine
Learning The Ropes
Bel Amine will become famous soon enough
Posts: 4
MC Status: 60
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Re: Music theory, idm and DJing; A must?!

Learning music theory is an efficient way to stand on the shoulders of the artists of the past. Instead of having to figure out that chords whose roots are a major or minor 3rd apart can sound quite interesting in sequence, we can study chromatic mediant relationships and see how it has been used before. Learning theory will only give you more tools to work with.

That being said, it is important to note that theory came about by people observing how the greats wrote their music. Haydn didn't care that he was writing in sonata form as much as he cared about utilizing a structural contour that allowed him to create expressive music. If you think about it, composers in the Western music tradition had been using functional harmony for a long time but it wasn't until the late 18th century that Rameau came about and described its use and characteristics.

Learning music theory will in no way limit your creativity. They teach students that parallel 5ths are forbidden in 4-part harmony, yet Bach, the king of 4-part harmony, breaks this rule from time to time.

Mastery of these concepts will only help you push your music further, that is if you approach learning music theory with the right frame of mind.

This is the important part. Knowledge of music theory is great tool but it will never be a substitute for a great imagination. There are no rules and you have to be brave enough to push your boundaries and make mistakes. Keep that in mind when learning music theory.

One thing that is unfortunately overlooked these days is ear-training and musicianship skills. Miles Davis said something along the lines that once he could play what he could hear in his head, then he became a musician. Ear-training is so underrated yet it is arguably one of the most valuable skills. Consider looking into that.

In the end studying Stravinsky could help you just as much as studying Venetian Snares in almost any kind of music you decide to write. To end on another Miles Davis, 'do not fear mistakes, there are none.'

Advertisements

Bel Amine is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Thanks to Bel Amine
Yzarc (24-02-2015)
Reply


Thread Tools

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Music theory is a bit confusing.. ultragoat Music Theory & Composition 23 28-12-2014 04:30 PM
Music theory Latzi Introduce Yourself 0 10-05-2014 02:36 PM
I'm relly bad with music theory... could yu help tell the key i'm in please? :D Benwaa Music Theory & Composition 28 28-09-2013 06:48 PM
Music Production / DJing Magazine HarleyThorne Music Scene Chat 3 23-05-2013 02:26 PM
Music theory SpTk Music Theory & Composition 11 10-02-2012 08:05 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:23 AM.


Electronic Music Forums

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.