Jazz Music Theory - Page 2
You are Unregistered, please register to gain Full access.    
Advertisements


Music Theory & Composition Questions & comments about composition, arrangement, and music theory. Music rules and how to follow or break them.

Reply
Thread Tools
Old 18-02-2015, 08:33 PM   #21
Joe Oso Dopke
Analog Lurker
Joe Oso Dopke is a savage MCJoe Oso Dopke is a savage MCJoe Oso Dopke is a savage MCJoe Oso Dopke is a savage MCJoe Oso Dopke is a savage MCJoe Oso Dopke is a savage MCJoe Oso Dopke is a savage MCJoe Oso Dopke is a savage MCJoe Oso Dopke is a savage MCJoe Oso Dopke is a savage MCJoe Oso Dopke is a savage MC
Joe Oso Dopke's Avatar
Detroit
Age: 23
Posts: 80
MC Status: 11195
Thanks: 8
Thanked 15 Times in 6 Posts
Re: Jazz Music Theory

The initial post is correct in that this is a very broad question.
It really depends on the jazz you're listening to! Summing up jazz into this singular box of "jazz" really doesn't give the genre the credit it deserves, as there are forms of jazz to which the only common thread is instrumentation.
As a broad rule of thumb, jazz has a lot to do with improvising over a given form, and expanding upon the given melody and chord progression to create something new and explore the space you've been given.
An important point to note, is that jazz theory (and all theory for that matter) are not rules, but guidelines, and the best attempt at describing what musicians are doing when they play; A lot of Jazz musicians really aren't thinking about theory when they play, but thinking about the music itself.
I would recommend checking out Miles Davis' "Nefertiti" (the album), Wayne Shorter's "Speak No Evil" (Also an album), and Art Blakey's "Free For All" (once again, an album).

Advertisements


------------------
"A creative artist works on his next composition because he was not satisfied with his previous one." - Dimitri Shostakovich
Joe Oso Dopke is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Currently Listening To: Juan Atkins
Old 24-02-2015, 07:49 PM   #22
Rodin
Rodin has a spectacular aura aboutRodin has a spectacular aura aboutRodin has a spectacular aura about
Rodin's Avatar
Oakland, CA
Posts: 67
MC Status: 236
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Re: Jazz Music Theory

Like people have been saying here, there are too many things that jazz jazz to be able to pin it down concisely, but I think one of the main characteristic things about jazz chord progressions is that they will often spend short periods of time in keys outside of the home key. e.g. The first bar of a tune might be in C, but then the 2nd and third bars will be in D minor, and then in the 4th bar it moves back to C again.

Mark Levine's Jazz Piano Book was mentioned here before, and it is a great resource. Mark Levine also has a book called The Jazz Theory Book, which is also great, and a little more general. He really lays out jazz theory in a very plain-spoken and easy to understand way in both of those books. I recommend them.

------------------
Rodin is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 24-02-2015, 08:58 PM   #23
Lug
Soxdix
Lug is a savage MCLug is a savage MCLug is a savage MCLug is a savage MCLug is a savage MCLug is a savage MCLug is a savage MCLug is a savage MCLug is a savage MCLug is a savage MCLug is a savage MC
Lug's Avatar
Age: 29
Posts: 7,377
MC Status: 80996280
Thanks: 5,227
Thanked 4,121 Times in 2,675 Posts
Re: Jazz Music Theory

the two main things I can think of that are very common in Jazz is ii-V-I chord progressions and tritone substitution (which is playing IIb instead of V)

something that happens often is you get a simple ii-V-I except each chord can be approached with a ii-V-I as well

like instead of D- G C
you would approach D- with a ii V I so
E-b5 A7 D- G C
and then you would do the same for G
E-b5 A7 D- A- D G C

and then inside of that you could go again. ii V I doesn't even need the I, that chord progression up here could be written
E-b5 A7 A- D G C
a succession of ii V

and then if you add some tritone substitution you would get something like
E-b5 A7 A-7 Ab7 G7 C
with that chromatic bassline

that's probably a very simple first step into jazz theory but it does appear in a lot of jazz tunes

Last edited by Lug; 24-02-2015 at 09:03 PM..

------------------
( o)<
|vv|
Lug is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2015, 07:01 PM   #24
Ekoli
Minor Glitch
Ekoli will become famous soon enoughEkoli will become famous soon enough
Posts: 30
MC Status: 110
Thanks: 1
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Re: Jazz Music Theory

@[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click here to register]
I don't really know of sites that are all around jazz music but I can give you artist to listen to.
George Benson
Bill evans
Thelonius Monk
Kurt Rosenwinkel
SNARKY PUPPY
Esperanza Spalding
Joshua Redman
Also put these artist into Spotify and start a radio for them and you'll get similar artist.
Ekoli is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2015, 11:15 PM   #25
wintergraphics
Learning The Ropes
wintergraphics will become famous soon enough
Brooklyn NY
Posts: 5
MC Status: 60
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Re: Jazz Music Theory

I recommend first learning the following scales, using "imaginative memory" to lock them in your mind: Ionian, Dorian,Phrygian, Lydian,Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian.

There is an iPhone app that is pretty buggy and old, but is a great start as a tool to help with getting these in your mind and their sound or flavor as well. I was hoping for an update at some point. Since I can't post links, look for the app called Guitar and Ear, released in 2012.

Then, to see how these scales link up and build on each other, Pat Martino is your man. The way he uses "geometry" to link the scales is seriously genius. This guy will blow your mind. I can't post links, but try Linear Expression by Pat Martino.
wintergraphics is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Thanks to wintergraphics
Fareed (15-03-2015)
Old 12-03-2015, 07:55 PM   #26
frajen
Analog Lurker
frajen has much to be proud offrajen has much to be proud offrajen has much to be proud offrajen has much to be proud offrajen has much to be proud offrajen has much to be proud offrajen has much to be proud offrajen has much to be proud offrajen has much to be proud offrajen has much to be proud of
Berkeley, CA
Posts: 93
MC Status: 1379
Thanks: 0
Thanked 27 Times in 21 Posts
Re: Jazz Music Theory

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhantomSignal View Post
Hey Frajen, random small world. You have three guesses to figure out who I am and from where you know me.
ha, PM incoming

------------------
Website
Soundcloud

Piano improvisations:
frajen is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 31-05-2015, 01:18 AM   #27
Ectoentropic
Regular Freak
Ectoentropic will become famous soon enoughEctoentropic will become famous soon enough
Colorado
Posts: 10
MC Status: 110
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Re: Jazz Music Theory

Quote:
Originally Posted by InsideMyMind View Post
There's an italian jazz piano player turned comedian who said: "Jazz is when you're playing a beautiful melody and then start to hit random notes that do not have anything to do with it."

Heh, not entirely wrong, with some schools of jazz. I had a jazz guitar teacher who would complain about what he called "jazz nazis", a group of people who "engaged in contests to see who could use the most hideous and unforgivable chord in a song" and went to concerts so they could be amazed by the absolutely dreadful chords their fellow jazz nazis were playing. A typical (exaggerated) jazz nazi progression is something like:

Ddim7

G9maj7

GminMaj7

Cmaj7

Cmaj

That said, modes and modal playing are a good start, as well as getting a handle on what sort of mood each evokes, as well as the moods evoked by changing from one to another. That said, speaking as a guy who knows a lot of music theory: in the end, music theory is not math, it's like color theory-it tells you what might look good, but it doesn't describe everything that looks good, and in the end it's more like a set of guidelines - in the end it's really more an ad hoc description of what sorts of playing tend to sound good, and while it's helpful, it is not a substitute for playing a lot and figuring out what sounds good to you.
Ectoentropic is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Thanks to Ectoentropic
vashima (24-10-2015)
Old 18-06-2015, 01:31 PM   #28
Praxisaxis
Knob Twiddler
Praxisaxis has a reputation beyond reputePraxisaxis has a reputation beyond reputePraxisaxis has a reputation beyond reputePraxisaxis has a reputation beyond reputePraxisaxis has a reputation beyond reputePraxisaxis has a reputation beyond reputePraxisaxis has a reputation beyond reputePraxisaxis has a reputation beyond reputePraxisaxis has a reputation beyond reputePraxisaxis has a reputation beyond reputePraxisaxis has a reputation beyond repute
Posts: 233
MC Status: 5810
Thanks: 33
Thanked 116 Times in 78 Posts
Re: Jazz Music Theory

Disclaimer: You cannot boil it down into a simple formula, no way . That said, there are a few easy things to start with to get you going.

For example, jazz chords can often be thought of as stacks of thirds (sometimes called tertian harmony [Only registered and activated users can see links. Click here to register]
). Meaning, the "colour notes" are frequently what occur when you continue stacking thirds on top of the standard triad.

E.g.
C 7 = C, E, G, Bb
C 9 = C, E, G, Bb, D
C 11 = C, E, G, Bb, D, F#
C 13 = C, E, G, Bb, D, F#, A

However. . . note that you can have any of the above which omit one or more of the inner intervals, and more importantly, the voicing you choose will make them sound more or less "jazzy." You may need to mess around with them to work that out.

(edit: nb. # 11 is the most common voicing in a dominant chord (ie flat 7) so that's why I put it here, but you can make dominant and also minor chords using natural 11. For a major chord (not dominant), the 11 is normally sharp.)

(edit 2: This looks like a decent on-line resource . . . just located it now [Only registered and activated users can see links. Click here to register]
)

And yes, the next thing to look at is chord substitution.

Last edited by Praxisaxis; 18-06-2015 at 01:56 PM..

------------------
-----------------------------
PRAXIS AXIS
Praxisaxis is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Thanks to Praxisaxis
vashima (24-10-2015)
Old 20-06-2015, 01:04 PM   #29
Orray
Soundscaper
Orray is a splendid one to beholdOrray is a splendid one to beholdOrray is a splendid one to beholdOrray is a splendid one to beholdOrray is a splendid one to beholdOrray is a splendid one to beholdOrray is a splendid one to behold
Orray's Avatar
Posts: 329
MC Status: 860
Thanks: 19
Thanked 17 Times in 14 Posts
Re: Jazz Music Theory

Not sure if this has been mentioned yet, but I've recently picked up "The Jazz Theory Book" by Mark Levine. Really good stuff. Recommend doing all the exercises in all keys
Orray is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2015, 07:38 AM   #30
saneliv
Knob Twiddler
saneliv has a reputation beyond reputesaneliv has a reputation beyond reputesaneliv has a reputation beyond reputesaneliv has a reputation beyond reputesaneliv has a reputation beyond reputesaneliv has a reputation beyond reputesaneliv has a reputation beyond reputesaneliv has a reputation beyond reputesaneliv has a reputation beyond reputesaneliv has a reputation beyond reputesaneliv has a reputation beyond repute
saneliv's Avatar
Posts: 209
MC Status: 2760
Thanks: 28
Thanked 55 Times in 38 Posts
Re: Jazz Music Theory

Jazz theory is actually somewhat over-complicated IMHO.
I am about a week away from posting a jazz harmony tutorial on IDMf (just need to produce the jpegs), so stay tuned.
saneliv is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Thanks to saneliv
QrQ (10-10-2015)
Old 10-10-2015, 09:09 PM   #31
Crude_beats
Banned
Crude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MCCrude_beats is a savage MC
Rocking my boat across the seven seas
Posts: 2,634
MC Status: 115728
Thanks: 1,268
Thanked 461 Times in 353 Posts
Re: Jazz Music Theory

You move the song around with the bassline. And jolly brass/vocal on top.

Drums are key in getting it to sound more jazz. Rides, those whisp drum hit.

And a bit of shuffle.

You can sample a jazz break and you are half way there.

Advertisements

Crude_beats is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Music theory, idm and DJing; A must?! Dhji Music Theory & Composition 47 08-08-2015 02:55 PM
Music theory Latzi Introduce Yourself 0 10-05-2014 02:36 PM
which bits of music theory for this? michi_mak Music Theory & Composition 22 06-01-2014 08:07 AM
learning music theory Kmac Music Theory & Composition 19 03-01-2013 08:36 PM
Music theory SpTk Music Theory & Composition 11 10-02-2012 08:05 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:59 PM.


Electronic Music Forums

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.