Transformational music?
You are Unregistered, please register to gain Full access.    
Advertisements


Sound Design, Mixing, & Studio Techniques Need to know how to make a specific sound? Want to improve your mix? Need advice on micing-up a drum kit? This is the area for you.

Reply
Thread Tools
Old 08-11-2017, 06:18 PM   #1
soundmodel
Analog Lurker
soundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant future
soundmodel's Avatar
Finland
Posts: 97
MC Status: 1710
Thanks: 0
Thanked 34 Times in 28 Posts
Transformational music?

Has anyone listened or made transformational music?

[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click here to register]


It should be a viable alternative to be implemented in environments such as Max/MSP, but I wonder what can it be used for?

Advertisements


------------------
soundmodel is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2017, 07:24 PM   #2
A.M
IDMf SupporterIDMf Artist
A.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MC
A.M's Avatar
Age: 52
Posts: 9,420
MC Status: 181510
Thanks: 10,632
Thanked 3,630 Times in 2,706 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

Quote:
Originally Posted by soundmodel View Post
..but I wonder what can it be used for?
This is just a wild guess off the top of my head, but..to induce a transformational experience maybe?

You might be better off asking this over in the [Only registered and activated users can see links. Click here to register]
, which seems a better fit for this.

------------------
A.M is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2017, 07:43 PM   #3
soundmodel
Analog Lurker
soundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant future
soundmodel's Avatar
Finland
Posts: 97
MC Status: 1710
Thanks: 0
Thanked 34 Times in 28 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

Quote:
Originally Posted by A.M View Post
This is just a wild guess off the top of my head, but..to induce a transformational experience maybe?

You might be better off asking this over in the [Only registered and activated users can see links. Click here to register]
, which seems a better fit for this.
Yes although not all transformations need to relate to notation, harmony and stuff. They can be DSP processes as well.

------------------
soundmodel is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2017, 08:03 PM   #4
A.M
IDMf SupporterIDMf Artist
A.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MC
A.M's Avatar
Age: 52
Posts: 9,420
MC Status: 181510
Thanks: 10,632
Thanked 3,630 Times in 2,706 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

Quote:
Originally Posted by soundmodel View Post
Yes although not all transformations need to relate to notation, harmony and stuff. They can be DSP processes as well.
Yes..but the link you supplied relates to the theory side of this..hence my suggestion.

------------------
A.M is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2017, 08:40 PM   #5
Critical
Granular Poster
Critical has a brilliant futureCritical has a brilliant futureCritical has a brilliant futureCritical has a brilliant futureCritical has a brilliant futureCritical has a brilliant futureCritical has a brilliant futureCritical has a brilliant futureCritical has a brilliant futureCritical has a brilliant futureCritical has a brilliant future
Critical's Avatar
Redditch
Posts: 52
MC Status: 1960
Thanks: 45
Thanked 39 Times in 25 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

Gutted. At a glance I thought it said transformer music and expected a full blown nerd / dubstep thread.
Critical is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Thanks to Critical
A.M (08-11-2017)
Old 09-11-2017, 02:57 AM   #6
TheStumps
Knob Twiddler
TheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond repute
TheStumps's Avatar
Alaska
Age: 38
Posts: 211
MC Status: 5410
Thanks: 41
Thanked 108 Times in 73 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

This isn't really novel.
We're just taking the same thing and changing the angle of visualizing relationships.

It's saying that rather than moving modes by circle of 5ths (e.g. C precedes G scales, etc...), that we create the hop from C to G through an operation of chordal transformation.

That is, rather than looking at the relationships of 5ths, you look at the relationship of the degree's shifts from one construction to the next.

In the words of John Oliver:
This would be nifty if you're teaching music theory because most music theory courses are hyper-focused on degree relationships...and that's probably why the primary proponents of this concept are university professors.

Functionally though, it doesn't do much to the music in a manner worth noting once the song is written.
It's not like saying Jazz by comparison to Blues, in which case the theoretical framework changes make direct impact upon the formation and expression of the music and the reception therein.

Now, this is all nice and all for learning, but honestly...intervals are by far more useful and far quicker, and far more reaching in powerful comprehensive control of tonal relationships than degrees and standard music theory focuses.

------------------
You, or anyone else, are free to do anything with the music that I make. I consider all of my productions to be public domain. If someone asks, I will give them the source files and any related sample files if they are needed. Music is a dialogue, not a speech. Any listener must be free to become the speaker at any time for the life of the dialogue to be retained. Let us, then, discuss in tone.
TheStumps is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Thanks to TheStumps
A.M (09-11-2017)
Old 09-11-2017, 10:47 AM   #7
soundmodel
Analog Lurker
soundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant future
soundmodel's Avatar
Finland
Posts: 97
MC Status: 1710
Thanks: 0
Thanked 34 Times in 28 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

Occasionally this kind of "changing the point of view" is fruitful.

Consider for example the Fourier Transform and the phase-frequency plane. They still relate to the Cartesian coordinates through trigonometric functions, but they do describe more complex phenomena and in a more elegant way.

So they're not the same thing. They can lead to different outcomes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheStumps View Post
This isn't really novel.
We're just taking the same thing and changing the angle of visualizing relationships.

It's saying that rather than moving modes by circle of 5ths (e.g. C precedes G scales, etc...), that we create the hop from C to G through an operation of chordal transformation.

That is, rather than looking at the relationships of 5ths, you look at the relationship of the degree's shifts from one construction to the next.

In the words of John Oliver:
This would be nifty if you're teaching music theory because most music theory courses are hyper-focused on degree relationships...and that's probably why the primary proponents of this concept are university professors.

Functionally though, it doesn't do much to the music in a manner worth noting once the song is written.
It's not like saying Jazz by comparison to Blues, in which case the theoretical framework changes make direct impact upon the formation and expression of the music and the reception therein.

Now, this is all nice and all for learning, but honestly...intervals are by far more useful and far quicker, and far more reaching in powerful comprehensive control of tonal relationships than degrees and standard music theory focuses.

------------------
soundmodel is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2017, 11:33 AM   #8
A.M
IDMf SupporterIDMf Artist
A.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MC
A.M's Avatar
Age: 52
Posts: 9,420
MC Status: 181510
Thanks: 10,632
Thanked 3,630 Times in 2,706 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

..and then again, you could always just trust you ears and your instincts, by creative and just letting nature take it's course.

Honestly, I totally understand the importance of Music Theory, but sometimes it just seems like the majority of it's proponents I've ever encountered are "all talk and no do"..basically more crippled by it's application and having to think about everything they do beforehand, than they are actually liberated by their knowledge and understanding of it.

I mean, it's all well and good if you know how to technically structure a piece of music in a given genre, but what good is it to you if you can't actually sit down and apply what you know in a creative way and actually produce something?

------------------
A.M is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2017, 11:38 AM   #9
soundmodel
Analog Lurker
soundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant future
soundmodel's Avatar
Finland
Posts: 97
MC Status: 1710
Thanks: 0
Thanked 34 Times in 28 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

Quote:
Originally Posted by A.M View Post
..and then again, you could always just trust you ears and your instincts, by creative and just letting nature take it's course.

Honestly, I totally understand the importance of Music Theory, but sometimes it just seems like the majority of it's proponents I've ever encountered are "all talk and no do"..basically more crippled by it's application and having to think about everything they do beforehand, than they are actually liberated by their knowledge and understanding of it.

I mean, it's all well and good if you know how to technically structure a piece of music in a given genre, but what good is it to you if you can't actually sit down and apply what you know in a creative way and actually produce something?
Yes, I've studied formal music theory and while understanding the things is essential for someone working with notation, it also presents a "formal" theory on "how to write music" for some, which I consider a bit limiting. I mean, some of the theory has come from studying composers and their music. But there's not necessarily correlation between making music and understanding/following theory. I'm not sure if anyone can write music "just by theory". Rather, the theory is merely a tool.

I know and can understand theory, but when I write music, I rely on intuition purely. If I need to do "technical" adjustments, then the relying on theory might step in.

------------------
soundmodel is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Thanks to soundmodel
A.M (09-11-2017)
Old 09-11-2017, 01:23 PM   #10
A.M
IDMf SupporterIDMf Artist
A.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MC
A.M's Avatar
Age: 52
Posts: 9,420
MC Status: 181510
Thanks: 10,632
Thanked 3,630 Times in 2,706 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

Quote:
Originally Posted by soundmodel View Post
Yes, I've studied formal music theory and while understanding the things is essential for someone working with notation, it also presents a "formal" theory on "how to write music" for some, which I consider a bit limiting. I mean, some of the theory has come from studying composers and their music. But there's not necessarily correlation between making music and understanding/following theory. I'm not sure if anyone can write music "just by theory". Rather, the theory is merely a tool.

I know and can understand theory, but when I write music, I rely on intuition purely. If I need to do "technical" adjustments, then the relying on theory might step in.
Sorry..I didn't mean YOU personally..just that most of the people I've ever met who talked about Music Theory all the time just never seemed to actually make music, even though they each claimed that's what they wanted to.

Personally, my understanding of Music Theory is very limited, but saying that, I've never had to fall back on it in order to produce the music I have to date. Yet those folks I'm talking about would always"look down" on me, ..like, "Sure, you make music, but you don't know anything about what you're actually doing." One of them actually laughed in my face!

Needless to say, I'm not friends with the guy anymore.

------------------
A.M is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2017, 01:29 PM   #11
soundmodel
Analog Lurker
soundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant future
soundmodel's Avatar
Finland
Posts: 97
MC Status: 1710
Thanks: 0
Thanked 34 Times in 28 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

Quote:
Originally Posted by A.M View Post
Sorry..I didn't mean YOU personally..just that most of the people I've ever met who talked about Music Theory all the time just never seemed to actually make music, even though they each claimed that's what they wanted to.

Personally, my understanding of Music Theory is very limited, but saying that, I've never had to fall back on it in order to produce the music I have to date. Yet those folks I'm talking about would always"look down" on me, ..like, "Sure, you make music, but you don't know anything about what you're actually doing." One of them actually laughed in my face!

Needless to say, I'm not friends with the guy anymore.
I've heard some arguments about some claiming formal music theory redundant, because "you can still write music with feeling".

However, it's not a binary thing like that the two are opposed to each other. Rather, understanding music theory can merely assist in the production of music.

It's a reductionist view to see that music theory would be entirely unnecessary for writing music.

Surely e.g. Aphex Twin can write his music without considering much theory. But even then he has gone through the process of learning music theory, even when he wouldn't have done it in a formal sense. It's possible to discover rules by oneself instead of being fed them. Formalization is then about just "giving a formal description to it".

------------------
soundmodel is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Thanks to soundmodel
A.M (09-11-2017)
Old 09-11-2017, 01:47 PM   #12
A.M
IDMf SupporterIDMf Artist
A.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MCA.M is a savage MC
A.M's Avatar
Age: 52
Posts: 9,420
MC Status: 181510
Thanks: 10,632
Thanked 3,630 Times in 2,706 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

Quote:
Originally Posted by soundmodel View Post
I've heard some arguments about some claiming formal music theory redundant, because "you can still write music with feeling".

However, it's not a binary thing like that the two are opposed to each other. Rather, understanding music theory can merely assist in the production of music.

It's a reductionist view to see that music theory would be entirely unnecessary for writing music.

Surely e.g. Aphex Twin can write his music without considering much theory. But even then he has gone through the process of learning music theory, even when he wouldn't have done it in a formal sense. It's possible to discover rules by oneself instead of being fed them. Formalization is then about just "giving a formal description to it".
Yes..I totally understand what you're saying, but my point is most M"usic Theory People" I've met offline tend to have this..dare I say it.."elitist" air about them..as if their understanding of MT somehow makes them better than somebody like me, who has hardly any MT formal training at all.

I tried to be diplomatic about it and basically said the exact same thing you just said in your past post, but their stance was alone the lines of "..to say you "compose" without MT is just a display of ignorance, as you can't compose without knowing the building blocks of music, that MT provides". I'm paraphrasing here, but that was basically the way such conversations went.

The so-called "friend" I mentioned before..the one I no longer talk to..started "composing" a track around the same time I started my first album. By the time I'd release the album, he still hadn't finished his first track..seriously!

In the course of one of our last conversations, I asked him about this and he said, It's all about getting it right..you can't rush quality." I guess that's true to a point, but I also knew it was a thinly disguised insult directed at me and my work.

Anyway, all that said, I understand what you mean..I just wish others who are into MT shared you understanding of it.

------------------
A.M is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2017, 09:11 PM   #13
TheStumps
Knob Twiddler
TheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond repute
TheStumps's Avatar
Alaska
Age: 38
Posts: 211
MC Status: 5410
Thanks: 41
Thanked 108 Times in 73 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

Quote:
Originally Posted by soundmodel View Post
Occasionally this kind of "changing the point of view" is fruitful.

Consider for example the Fourier Transform and the phase-frequency plane. They still relate to the Cartesian coordinates through trigonometric functions, but they do describe more complex phenomena and in a more elegant way.

So they're not the same thing. They can lead to different outcomes.
My point is that it's not good enough.
Standard music theory is dysfunctional because it is overly focused on the nature of degrees.
The problem here is that degrees are great to know if you are arriving at music from a baroquian tradition point of view where chordal melody relationships are the primary driver, however, if you are arriving at music after the baroquian revolution of counterpoint melodic comprehension and live in a time with a full chordal catalog well developed and the nature of chordal relationships is no longer an arcane mystery to humanity, then degree driven theory is a clumsy way to move about.

It's clumsy because it's not a core function of tonal patterns in scales or modes (sets of notes), but instead simply describes the seating arrangement of such notes only in relation of the set itself. It ignores all other tones than that which is in scale as the primary nomenclature.

If I set down a ratchet set, and then I pick 7 sizes and set those out, then I have made the account of size information incomplete.
Imagine who I took them out for doesn't know of the set. They only know of those I provide; the 7. Further imagine they don't know sizes in mm and only refer to sizes based on "smaller" or "larger" relationships.

That is effectively degree focused music theory because it doesn't couple in the math regarding the actual governing motion of tonal sound along a set such as a scale or mode.
For all modes, for example, there is only one pattern of information required to remember and you will then be able to slide between any key, and any mode.

You cannot express that in degree theory. It literally lacks the ability to communicate the core function of modes down to a single expression of information, due to having been created during a period of music history where humanity (in the west) was learning how to line up multiple melodies on top of each other - that is; chords.

The only means of simplicity in degrees theory are by agreed convention.
So, for example, we move around the keys in a mode informationally by 5ths.
Why?
Just because the 5th is a strong tonal production of note couplings only topped by the octave in the baroquian mind, but the octave isn't a different note, so we can't use that to inform moving around keys in the modes.

I'd like to point out that had asthetics of the baroquian period differed slightly, we would be moving by 3rds and not 5ths in degree theory.

Now, transformationalism is even more clumsy because it syays to toss out that 5th as the means of leaping around and to instead move by chordal degree relationships.

Look.
I get it, but it's just not that useful.
If I want that, then I can get it by just doing counterpoint and not tossing out one of the few static reference points in degree theory - reference by 5th.

The amount of time it would take to arrive at a solution of movement using transformational methods over the amount of time it would take me to move by interval information from on mode to another is the difference between measuring a meter with a metric stick and measuring a meter by grabbing blocks n1 with a length (A) and then adding them to a set of blocks n2 with length (B) and by doing so defining a relationship between n1 and n2 sets such that n3's length (C) must be correlated to the distance remaining between point n7 less n1+n2's lengths (A) and (B) with respect to leave room for relative distances (D), (E), (F), (G) defined in block sets n4, n5, n6 and of course n7, respectively.

If intervals are the metric stick, and transformationalism is the above algebra, the degrees are the variables of algebra.

They have their uses, but why in the hell would anyone want to make THE driver of informational set shifts (moving from one key to another, or from one scale/mode to another) the relative point of a relative point over a consistently static measurement?

Imagine making the conversion between meter and kilometer the relation between the meter and the foot.

Last edited by TheStumps; 09-11-2017 at 09:22 PM..

------------------
You, or anyone else, are free to do anything with the music that I make. I consider all of my productions to be public domain. If someone asks, I will give them the source files and any related sample files if they are needed. Music is a dialogue, not a speech. Any listener must be free to become the speaker at any time for the life of the dialogue to be retained. Let us, then, discuss in tone.
TheStumps is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2017, 09:25 PM   #14
soundmodel
Analog Lurker
soundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant future
soundmodel's Avatar
Finland
Posts: 97
MC Status: 1710
Thanks: 0
Thanked 34 Times in 28 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

Surely one can try to describe any kind of transformation that one wishes, so it doesn't have be tied to some formal music theory stuff.

Particularly one could probably to crazy stuff if one made automation curves based on some mathematical expressions rather than by drawing them by hand.

------------------
soundmodel is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2017, 09:34 PM   #15
TheStumps
Knob Twiddler
TheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond repute
TheStumps's Avatar
Alaska
Age: 38
Posts: 211
MC Status: 5410
Thanks: 41
Thanked 108 Times in 73 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

Quote:
Originally Posted by soundmodel View Post
Surely one can try to describe any kind of transformation that one wishes, so it doesn't have be tied to some formal music theory stuff.
Anyone can do anything they want.
Transformationalism isn't about that.

It's about saying we SHOULDN'T move by 5ths and SHOULD define motion between keys, scales, and modes by a relative relation to a relative relation.

Well my thought on that is. Piss off.
That's the exact wrong direction to the problem within music theory language.

The problem isn't that a static reference doesn't jive with the relative nature of degrees, and therefore we should remove all but relativity itself.
The problem is exactly opposite.

The 5th was fine, but you're moving around that 5th by sloppy relative degrees instead of static intervals, leaving degrees to describe tonal character rather than motion.

------------------
You, or anyone else, are free to do anything with the music that I make. I consider all of my productions to be public domain. If someone asks, I will give them the source files and any related sample files if they are needed. Music is a dialogue, not a speech. Any listener must be free to become the speaker at any time for the life of the dialogue to be retained. Let us, then, discuss in tone.
TheStumps is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2017, 09:44 PM   #16
soundmodel
Analog Lurker
soundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant future
soundmodel's Avatar
Finland
Posts: 97
MC Status: 1710
Thanks: 0
Thanked 34 Times in 28 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

I don't understand your pessimism.

I mean, one can do transformations that play on the effects or filters or FM amount or such just like when automating. It uses transformations and is thus transformational music.

------------------
soundmodel is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2017, 10:12 PM   #17
TheStumps
Knob Twiddler
TheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond repute
TheStumps's Avatar
Alaska
Age: 38
Posts: 211
MC Status: 5410
Thanks: 41
Thanked 108 Times in 73 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

Quote:
Originally Posted by soundmodel View Post
I don't understand your pessimism.

I mean, one can do transformations that play on the effects or filters or FM amount or such just like when automating. It uses transformations and is thus transformational music.
Oh, you've reassigned the meaning.
OK I guess, but it's rather meaningless at that point.

This has music and transforms as well:
That doesn't make it transformationalism.

A pitch shifter is not employing transformational music theory.

This is:
"The goal of transformational theory is to change the focus fromámusical objects—such as the "Cámajor chord" or "G major chord"—to relations between objects."

------------------
You, or anyone else, are free to do anything with the music that I make. I consider all of my productions to be public domain. If someone asks, I will give them the source files and any related sample files if they are needed. Music is a dialogue, not a speech. Any listener must be free to become the speaker at any time for the life of the dialogue to be retained. Let us, then, discuss in tone.
TheStumps is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2017, 10:13 PM   #18
soundmodel
Analog Lurker
soundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant futuresoundmodel has a brilliant future
soundmodel's Avatar
Finland
Posts: 97
MC Status: 1710
Thanks: 0
Thanked 34 Times in 28 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

My idea was to trial with transformational music.

Because I think it's a great idea to be done in Max/MSP.

------------------
soundmodel is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2017, 10:32 PM   #19
TheStumps
Knob Twiddler
TheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond reputeTheStumps has a reputation beyond repute
TheStumps's Avatar
Alaska
Age: 38
Posts: 211
MC Status: 5410
Thanks: 41
Thanked 108 Times in 73 Posts
Re: Transformational music?

Quote:
Originally Posted by soundmodel View Post
My idea was to trial with transformational music.

Because I think it's a great idea to be done in Max/MSP.
Then try transformational music theory by learning transformational music theory and then work on it diagramatically however you want.
That said...transformationalism comes from relational diagram explosions of the 50's and 60's (from which things like Max are derived), so the answer is: yes.

Yes, transformationalism will fit in with Max just fine.

Advertisements


------------------
You, or anyone else, are free to do anything with the music that I make. I consider all of my productions to be public domain. If someone asks, I will give them the source files and any related sample files if they are needed. Music is a dialogue, not a speech. Any listener must be free to become the speaker at any time for the life of the dialogue to be retained. Let us, then, discuss in tone.
TheStumps is offline   Thanks Reply With Quote
Thanks to TheStumps
A.M (09-11-2017)
Reply


Thread Tools

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Facebook to take over all music everywhere? Roo Stercogburn Technology & Lifestyle 9 08-11-2017 05:39 PM
Electronic Music Composition Enthusiasm and Frustration (only in pictures!!!) Daggit The Side Room 19 31-10-2017 06:01 AM
Constraints in music making to push creativity tehbosh The Studio 12 22-10-2017 04:46 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:10 PM.


Electronic Music Forums

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.